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NRSI: Computers & Writing Systems

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You are here: Encoding
Short URL: http://scripts.sil.org/Encoding

Character set encoding basics Peter Constable, 2001-06-13
In understanding technologies for working with multilingual and multi-script text data, we need to start with an understanding of character encoding. Systems for working with text involve a collection of processes that work together—processes for creating and editing text, presenting it, for sorting, for laying out paragraphs and wrapping at line breaks, etc. Character encoding is the thing that ties all of these processes together.
Computer systems employ a wide variety of character encodings. The most important of these for us is Unicode. It is also important for us to understand other encodings, however, and how they relate to Unicode. In this section, I want to look at some basic concepts that relate to all encodings, and also give an overview of legacy encodings and their importance for us.

XSEM: XML Scripture Encoding Model Dennis Drescher, 2001-09-06
The XML Scripture Encoding Model (XSEM), an SIL project, is a markup language that conforms to the Extensible Markup Language (XML) version 1.0 standard. On this page you will find information about the model and the project.

Character Encoding Choices in Paratext 6 Peter Constable, 2003-04-29
This article discusses options available to users for how their data can be encoded in Paratext 6, and looks at pros and cons of those options.

Windows and Codepages Martin Hosken, 1997-12-29
This document examines how Windows 95 handles multi-lingual computing. It looks at Languages, Codepages, Locales, Unicode and Fonts with particular reference to their support in Windows 95.
An alternative title for this document might be: “How to add a new script to Windows 95 and fail”.


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